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Second Sight Argus II glasses

Retinal prosthesis are devices that allow those who have become blind due to some conditions to have their vision partially restored. Though very useful for perceiving shape and movement, the current generation of retinal prosthesis doesn’t have a high enough resolution for their users to effectively read. During a recent study researchers flashed braille patterns directly onto a patient’s retina instead, thereby allowing him to read.

The physical prosthesis used in this study is actually not bleeding edge new, despite being a fairly remarkable piece of technology. Developed by medical device company Second Sight, the Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System consists of a 6 x 10 electrode array implanted on a patient’s retina, connected to a visor that combines a camera, onboard computer for video processing, and inductive coil for wireless power/data transfer to the electrodes.

Unfortunately, with a field of vision composed of sixty pixels it is exceedingly hard to make out details like the small letters on a page of text, or even a large ones on street sign.  While future stimulation devices are predicted to have higher resolutions, researchers wanted to exploit the capabilities of current prosthetics to allow the patient to read now.

Electrode array implanted on the retina

The patient involved could already read braille in the more traditional tactile way. Researchers bypassed the camera and directly stimulated braille patterns onto his retina, flashing each letter for half a second before moving onto the next. While he was only shown words ranging from one to four letters long, he still recognized 89% of them right overall.

Authored primarily by Second Sight, researchers from Brigham Young University in the U.S. as well as the Institut de la Vision and National Ophthalmology Hospital  Paris, France also participated in the study. It was carried out in the Centre Hospitalier National d’Ophtalmologie des Quinze-Vingts, in Paris, France.

Sources:
frontiersin.org
2-sight.eu

  • http://www.automateandvalidate.com/ hbliujgit

    The actual physical prosthesis employed in this learn is actually not bleeding edge new, despite being a fairly great part of tech. Developed by health pump company Second Glance, the Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System is made up of the 6 x ten electrode range implanted for a patient’s retina, connected up to a visor which integrates a digital camera, onboard computer for video processing, and also inductive coil for wi-fi power/data transfer to the electrodes.

  • http://www.automateandvalidate.com bikramkumar

    The tangible prosthesis utilized in the research is actually not bleeding edge new, despite being a very amazing piece of technology. Developed by medical pump company Second Glance, the Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System consists of the 6 x ten electrode range implanted upon a patient’s retina, connected on to a visor which integrates a digital camera, onboard computer for video processing, and additionally inductive coil for wireless power/data transfer to the electrodes. .

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    The immune system may encapsulate the implant as an attempt to remove the foreign material from the site of the tissue by encapsulating the implant in fibrogen and platelets. The encapsulation of the implant can lead to further complications since the thick layers of fibrous capsulation may prevent the implant from performing the desired functions. Bacteria may attack the fibrous encapsulation and become embedded into the fibers. Since the layers of fibers are thick, antibiotics may not be able to reach the bacteria and the bacteria may grow and infect the surrounding tissue. In order to remove the bacteria, the implant would have to be removed. Lastly, the immune system may accept the presence of the implant and repair and remodel the surrounding tissue. Similar responses occur when the body initiates an allergic foreign body response. In the case of an allergic foreign body response, the implant would have to be removed (Dee, Puleo, Bizios, 2002).